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Key differences in the new Regional Pest Management Plan

11 months ago
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GOOD NEIGHBOUR RULES

  • Good neighbour rules have been proposed for gorse, broom, Russell lupin, ragwort, nodding thistle, rabbits and wilding conifers. These are new rules that can bind land occupiers, including the Crown, to perform pest control if a neighbouring property is doing so.

NEW GORSE AND BROOM RULES

  • The plan proposes to extend the gorse and broom free areas beyond the existing areas.
  • New 10:10 rules are proposed, meaning if a landowner is gorse and broom free 10 metres from their boundaries, then neighbouring properties must also manage these pest plants 10 metres from their boundary.

NEW EXCLUSION PESTS

  • African feather grass, Chilean needle grass, false tamarisk and moth plant have all been added to the list of pests we hope to keep out of Otago.

NEW PESTS

  • There are proposed new rules for Russell lupins, and wilding conifers now include more species.

NEW SITE-LED PROGRAMMES

  • New site-led programmes have been added to manage a range of additional pest plants and animals in areas where there are special biodiversity values. These include Chilean flame creeper, Darwin’s barberry, possums and mustelids.

PESTS ARE SPLIT INTO FIVE DIFFERENT PEST MANAGEMENT PROGRAMMES

  • This is a different approach from the current plan. The programmes are: exclusion, eradication, progressive containment, sustained control, and site-led programmes. Please see the summary guide for more information.

FOLLOWS A NATIONAL TEMPLATE

  • The new proposed plan follows a national template to ensure some consistency across NZ. This will bring Otago’s proposed plan in line with other regional councils around NZ, especially neighbouring councils.

RABBIT RULES

  • Simpler rabbit control rules are proposed that no longer require management plans. Please refer to section 6.4.6 in the proposed plan.
  • This means ORC can take compliance action sooner and our rules align with neighbouring Councils.

COST ALLOCATION

  • A new way of allocating the costs of managing the pests in the plan is proposed, which will change how the management of different species are rated.

Consultation has concluded

Weir 10 months ago
unless you can clearly determine the difference between feral cats and a pet cat should you really be going through with this, trapping live animals and neutering them would be humane there is enough poisoning/killing of animals who would be to your proposal "collateral damage" as we the public pay your outrageous rates it would be good for once if the public was taken seriously and acted upon