Otago Navigation Safety Bylaw Draft 2018


Otago Regional Council is looking at maritime management to manage risks and ensure good practice. We want your say on the proposed bylaws. You are also welcome to raise any other matters relating to navigation safety you think should be considered.

Any person or organisation can make a submission on the draft 2018 bylaw. Submissions can be made online here or by post; you can find a submission form to print off in the documents library. A hearing on submissions may occur if there is sufficient interest; you can tell us if you are interested in this through your submission.

Once the bylaw is approved by Council it will be published on the ORC website and public notices published advising of its commencement date.


Otago Regional Council is looking at maritime management to manage risks and ensure good practice. We want your say on the proposed bylaws. You are also welcome to raise any other matters relating to navigation safety you think should be considered.

Any person or organisation can make a submission on the draft 2018 bylaw. Submissions can be made online here or by post; you can find a submission form to print off in the documents library. A hearing on submissions may occur if there is sufficient interest; you can tell us if you are interested in this through your submission.

Once the bylaw is approved by Council it will be published on the ORC website and public notices published advising of its commencement date.

  • Media Release: Otago Navigation Safety Bylaw 2018 Draft

    by Shayde.Bain, 22 days ago

    Otago Regional Council (ORC) has opened up the draft Navigation Safety Bylaw 2018 for public consultation.

    ORC is responsible for the regulation of ports, harbours, waters, and maritime-related activities in the Otago region under the Maritime Transport Act (1994).

    The bylaw will cover maritime safety in all inland waters and all coastal waters out to the 12-nautical limit of the territorial sea of Otago, apart from the waters of the Queenstown Lakes District and Lake Dunstan. Responsibility for these waters has previously been transferred by ORC to Queenstown Lakes District Council (QLDC) and Central...

    Otago Regional Council (ORC) has opened up the draft Navigation Safety Bylaw 2018 for public consultation.

    ORC is responsible for the regulation of ports, harbours, waters, and maritime-related activities in the Otago region under the Maritime Transport Act (1994).

    The bylaw will cover maritime safety in all inland waters and all coastal waters out to the 12-nautical limit of the territorial sea of Otago, apart from the waters of the Queenstown Lakes District and Lake Dunstan. Responsibility for these waters has previously been transferred by ORC to Queenstown Lakes District Council (QLDC) and Central Otago District Council (CODC).

    The Harbourmaster, Steve Rushbrook, said the previous 2003 Otago and Karitane bylaw covered only Otago and Karitane harbours and has since lapsed.

    “In preparing the draft bylaws I have reviewed the navigation safety bylaws of QLDC, CODC, and the surrounding Southland and Canterbury regions.

    “Little content was suitable to be carried over from the 2003 bylaw as it was prepared under provisions that have since been repealed and replaced,” he said.

    A companion document to the bylaw has also been released, which is the Harbourmaster Directions. This is not up for public consultation but sets the speed limits for all vessels in Otago Harbour and is primarily aimed at commercial shipping activities.

    You can find the 2018 draft bylaw, harbourmaster directions and more information about this process online at www.yoursay.orc.govt/navsafetybylaw.

    For further information please contact:

    Steve Rushbrook – Harbourmaster – 0275835196
    steve.rushbrook@orc.govt.nz

    Emma Schranz - Senior Media Advisor - 0276275894

    emma.schranz@orc.govt.nz


  • Introduction to the draft

    by GemmaW, 22 days ago
    20171010 142231 142231


    Context

    Under the Maritime Transport Act (1994), Otago Regional Council (ORC) has the authority to regulate ports, harbours, waters and maritime-related activities in the Otago Region.

    Port Chalmers and Dunedin are busy commercial ports that are accessed by narrow waterways. Due to this, evasive action by ships may result in grounding with attendant risks to vessels, people and to the environment. For these reasons it’s important to manage the risks arising from shared use of these waterways by shipping and by recreational water users.

    In recognition of the maritime safety risk profile, in 2017 ORC appointed a full-time professional harbourmaster...


    Context

    Under the Maritime Transport Act (1994), Otago Regional Council (ORC) has the authority to regulate ports, harbours, waters and maritime-related activities in the Otago Region.

    Port Chalmers and Dunedin are busy commercial ports that are accessed by narrow waterways. Due to this, evasive action by ships may result in grounding with attendant risks to vessels, people and to the environment. For these reasons it’s important to manage the risks arising from shared use of these waterways by shipping and by recreational water users.

    In recognition of the maritime safety risk profile, in 2017 ORC appointed a full-time professional harbourmaster who is based in Dunedin. In addition, ORC has embarked on a series of actions with the aim of putting in place a regime of maritime management that effectively manages risk and is consistent with good practice.

    Coverage of the draft 2018 bylaw

    Responsibility for managing maritime safety in waters of the Queenstown Lakes District and Lake Dunstan has previously been transferred by ORC to Queenstown Lakes District Council (QLDC) and to Central Otago District Council (CODC) respectively. This proposal addresses maritime safety in the remainder of the Otago region, including all navigable inland waters and all marine waters out to the 12 nautical limit of the Territorial Sea.

    There is currently no navigation safety bylaw in place in these parts of the Otago region. A previous bylaw, issued in 2003, covered only Otago and Karitane Harbours and has since lapsed.

    Bylaw preparation

    In preparing this proposed bylaw the Harbourmaster has reviewed the navigation safety bylaws of QLDC and CODC and of the adjoining Southland and Canterbury regions. The lapsed 2003 Otago and Karitane bylaw was also reviewed.

    A primary focus of the draft bylaw is recreational activities. ORC has drafted the bylaw with the objective of applying the minimum set of risk controls required for navigation safety. The bylaw sets out essential controls on practices for people using the waters of the Otago region.

    Relationship to Harbourmaster Directions

    A companion document, the Harbourmaster Directions, is aimed primarily at commercial shipping activities. Speed limits for all vessels in Otago Harbour are also set by Harbourmaster Direction.


  • What are the main elements of the proposed bylaw?

    by Shayde.Bain, 22 days ago
    20170210 111141 083249

    Bylaw Structure


    The bylaw has six parts plus appendices:
    Part 1 – Preliminary (includes definitions of terms used in the bylaw)
    Part 2 – General Navigation Safety Requirements
    Part 3 – Speed Limits, Reserved Areas and Access Lanes
    Part 4 – Anchoring and Mooring
    Part 5 – Special Controls on Activities in Otago Harbour
    Part 6 – Maritime Safety Administrative Matters
    Appendices – maps showing where various controls apply


    Bylaw Structure


    The bylaw has six parts plus appendices:
    Part 1 – Preliminary (includes definitions of terms used in the bylaw)
    Part 2 – General Navigation Safety Requirements
    Part 3 – Speed Limits, Reserved Areas and Access Lanes
    Part 4 – Anchoring and Mooring
    Part 5 – Special Controls on Activities in Otago Harbour
    Part 6 – Maritime Safety Administrative Matters
    Appendices – maps showing where various controls apply


  • Is Bylaw Appropriate?

    by Shayde.Bain, 22 days ago
    20170216 131353 131353

    Under Section 155 of the Local Government Act 2002, local authorities are required to determine whether a bylaw is the most appropriate way of addressing a perceived problem, whether the bylaw is in the most appropriate form, and whether it gives rise to any implications under the New Zealand Bill of Rights Act 1990.

    Along with other regional councils and port companies, ORC is party to a Memorandum of Understanding with Maritime New Zealand in which all parties agree to adopt and implement the New Zealand Port &Harbour Marine Safety Code. It is an expectation of the code that...

    Under Section 155 of the Local Government Act 2002, local authorities are required to determine whether a bylaw is the most appropriate way of addressing a perceived problem, whether the bylaw is in the most appropriate form, and whether it gives rise to any implications under the New Zealand Bill of Rights Act 1990.

    Along with other regional councils and port companies, ORC is party to a Memorandum of Understanding with Maritime New Zealand in which all parties agree to adopt and implement the New Zealand Port &Harbour Marine Safety Code. It is an expectation of the code that Councils will use their statutory powers to manage and maintain their harbours and navigable waters so that they are fit for the intended uses. This includes putting in place appropriate bylaws to manage maritime safety risks.

    A Navigational Safety Review undertaken by Navigatus Consulting Limited for ORC in 2016 identified that management of maritime safety risks for Port Otago relied on bylaw provisions to manage some risks, yet the 2003 bylaw had lapsed. The report recommended that a new bylaw be established and that navigational safety be actively managed.

    The ORC considers that a bylaw is the most appropriate way of ensuring navigation safety in the waters of the Otago Region, that the proposed bylaw is in the most appropriate form, and that it does not give rise to any implications under the New Zealand Bill of Rights Act.